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Wu wins US Open boys' singles title for China

September 10, 2017 - US Open Junior Boys' Singles Champion Yibing Wu at the 2017 US Open.

WHAT HAPPENED: One day after winning the US Open boys' doubles title, Wu Yibing of China beat No. 1 seed Axel Geller in boys' singles on Sunday, 6-4, 6-4, to capture a clean sweep of the 2017 US Open junior titles.

As the first player from China to win any junior title at Flushing Meadows, the 17-year-old Wu said after Sunday's win, "I'd like to thank all the Chinese people here" in the Grandstand. "It's for China. It's for me. Xie Xie."

Geller, the 18-year-old from Argentina said, "He was better today and I congratulate him." Later on Sunday, Geller said he would be heading to Stanford University, where he will be a freshman. "I have orientation in one week, so I'm excited for what's coming," he said.

When the match began, it seemed like it would be a battle between two powerhitting baseliners, and if Geller could keep slamming 125 mph aces like he did to hold at 2-1 in the first set, the Argentine would prevail. At 3-all in the first set, Geller fired a 131mph ace on the penultimate point to pull ahead 4-3. But then, at 4-all Geller's serve turned sour. He double faulted away the ninth game and gave Wu a 5-4 lead. In the next game, Wu held serve and captured the set on his third set point.

In the second set, Geller lost control of his biggest weapon (faulting on 50 percent of his first serves) and allowed Wu to create 20 winners by cleverly mixing up his shots and pace. In effect, Wu became the creator and Geller became the retreiver. Wu quickly took a 4-0 lead. But just then, serves set in. Leading 5-2, Wu fauled to convert six match points. Geller held serve in the next game to narrow the gap to 5-4, but Wu responded by holding serve for the match.

WHAT IT MEANS: Wu not only made history for China, but he denied Geller the chance to become only the second US Open boys' singles champion from Argentina. The first (and last) was David Nalbandian in 1998.

MATCH POINT: No male player from mainland China has ever broken the Top 100. Will Wu eventually become the first?