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50 Years, 50 Champions

50 for 50: Ilie Nastase

50 for 50: Ilie Nastase

The 1972 men's final was a study in contrast between hometown favorite Arthur Ashe and the mercurial, flamboyant, often controversial Romanian Ilie Nastase. Nastase appeared to be on the verge of losing the match but battled back to win in five thrilling sets.

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50 for 50: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario

50 for 50: Arantxa Sánchez Vicario

Arantxa Sánchez Vicario reached two finals at the US Open during her career and defeated Steffi Graf in a thrilling 1994 final to become the first woman from Spain to win the women’s singles title in the 108-year history of the tournament.

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50 for 50: Manuel Orantes

50 for 50: Manuel Orantes

In the first year the US Open was played on clay in 1975, one of the game’s greatest grinders—Spain’s Manuel Orantes—finished first at Forest Hills, playing his way to the title with a game that showcased equal amounts of grit, guts and gallantry and included one of the greatest comebacks in the history of the event.

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Follow along as we countdown the 50 Greatest Moments

Follow along as we countdown the 50 Greatest Moments

This year, as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the US Open, we’re counting down the 50 most memorable moments in the history of America’s Grand Slam. 

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50 for 50: Rod Laver

50 for 50: Rod Laver

Rod Laver made tennis history at the US Open in 1969 when he won his 11th and final major singles title to complete an unprecedented second calendar-year Grand Slam.

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Join the #USOpen50 Celebration

Join the #USOpen50 Celebration

Share Your Favorite On/Off Court Moments. Be part of the conversation using hashtag #USOpen50 and tag @USOpen

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50 for 50: Samantha Stosur

50 for 50: Samantha Stosur

Serena Williams entered the 2001 women's singles final as the overwhelming favorite, but Samantha Stosur was too good on this day, beating the American at her own game with a barrage of booming forehands.

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50 for 50: Lleyton Hewitt

50 for 50: Lleyton Hewitt

In 2001, Lleyton Hewitt was an up-and-coming talent – a 20-year-old Aussie, known for his intense play, mental toughness and screams of “C’mon” that so many of the world’s top pros voice on court today.

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50 for 50: Virginia Wade

50 for 50: Virginia Wade

Virginia Wade etched her name into the record books when, in 1968, she won the first-ever US Open women’s singles title in the Open era.

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50 for 50: Arthur Ashe

50 for 50: Arthur Ashe

Arthur Ashe captured the first US Open men’s championship in 1968, becoming the first African-American man to win a major title.

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